Sunrise: 06:48  Sunset: 18:57
MGC Clubhouse

Our clubhouse provides a warm and inviting atmosphere for both members and visitors.

Bespoke Weddings

We are able to offer you a venue and complehensive wedding package for your special day.

Clubhouse Patio

Our clubhouse patio offer you the perfect place to relax following a great game of golf.

Clubhouse Patio

Relax and enjoy views across the course from our clubhouse patio.

MGC Golf Course

Enjoy 18 holes of testing golf on a course consistently praised by members and visitors.

Wedding Venue

We offer a superb wedding venue with great catering facilities and ample car-parking.

Fenland Views

Formed in 1923, MGC is a well established Club and course.

Clubhouse

View from the 10th tee towards the clubhouse.

Weddings and Functions Venue

We are able to cater for weddings and a wide range of private functions.

View of the 2nd Green and pond

The 2nd hole at MGC is a testing par 3.

MGC Seniors
March Golf Club has an active Seniors Section.
View over the course from the patio
View from the putting green towards the 6th hole.
Previous Next Play Pause

The Golf Course at Frog's Abbey is the fourth site in March where the game has been played since a club was formed in 1923.

March Golf Club began in 1923 at Cavalry Barn Farm where three fields totaling 40 acres were rented from Mr. Frank Sole. The land was grazed by cattle so steps were over fences, greens were fenced off and fairways were only allowed to be cut periodically. The land rent was £20 per annum, membership 3 Guineas and Green fees for the occasional visitor was 2s. 0d. per day. The late Bill Randall of Knights End Road caddied for some golfers on this course and received 6d for his labours.

In 1925 the land was acquired by March Urban Council for housing development, thus, in 1925 the Club moved to Badgeney where five fields were rented from Donald Grounds. Rent for the new course was only £15 per annum but the owner would only permit golfing from October to April, the grazing cattle having priority during the summer! A horse drawn grass cutter was acquired and since it could only be used during Autumn and Spring, a half share in the cutter was sold to March Cricket Club, who only needed it during the summer months. At this time the Club had 46 members and at the end of the Club's year the balance was £5 9s. 6d, which was considered satisfactory.

Following the general desire of members to play golf all the year round, at a meeting on October 5th 1927, it was agreed to rent 37 acres of pasture at Hatchwoods Farm, which was available without restrictions; well, nearly, as the greens and the area surrounding the wooden clubhouse had to be roped or fenced off, this time to prevent the joint threat of cattle and sheep ruining the golfer's fun. This area of March was well-known in the first half of the 20th Century as being a natural beauty spot and bird-watchers and keen naturalists were often seen near the large pond on the course. Entrance to the fields was through Steeple Walk (also known as Lovers' Walk).

In November 1930 the Club was offered a 30' Ransome Green Mower for £87 by Bodger Bros. Though keen to have the mower the Club only had £40 available. "Not to worry", said Bodgers, "pay the balance off over two years - no extra charge". In 1938/39 Club membership had risen to 160. During the years of World War Two membership diminished to 60 or 70 people and the Club struggled to survive. In 1941 the local Army Commander requested use of the course for military drill. This was granted subject to making good any damage and, most importantly, that it was understood the bar was strictly out of bounds!

Early 1961, the time to be on the move again. The new owner of Hatchwoods Farm indicated his intention of selling the farm and was not willing to sell separately the land rented to the Golf Club. A Special General Meeting was held on February 10th 1961 to consider what should be done, faced with the closure of Hatchwoods in October 1961.

At a further Special General Meeting on March 3rd 1961, a sub-committee was authorised to buy two fields at Grange Farm from W. L. Shepperson. The members had decided this time they were going to have security.....and privacy. Typically, nothing was simple or straightforward. The clay land had been ploughed for potatoes, but the members set to work to, 'de-plough' it, dug up their greens from Hatchwoods and began work. The Course Architect was Alan Gow, ex-Belgian Professional Champion, and the team of workers were the 250 members. It only took three weeks to have the greens transferred to the new site...and laid. The rest of the acreage was seeded. The course became known as Frog's Abbey and opened for play in May 1962.

The old timber clubhouse was moved to the new course in February/March 1962 and in 1964 an extension was built and later became the Pro Shop. This is the site where the current Pro Shop is situated.  At the time of the move there were no natural hazards except the hedge and and ditch which bisected the course. Trees were planted and the bunkers built.

By 1968 March already had its own part-time professional, Stan Barrow, who had been an assistant professional at Lytham St Anne's. A 20 strong management committee ran things, and seven lady members were on this committee.

In 1970 an additional eight acres of land north of of the 1st green was bought from Mr. Albert Deptford, who generously offered to spread the cost over four years without any added interest. This became the present 2nd hole and part of the 3rd and was brought into play in 1972.

New changing rooms were built in 1976 followed by the new lounge, dining room, kitchen and bar in 1978. The lounge was designated the Aveling Lounge in memory of Don Aveling, Past Captain, Past Chairman and Past President, who was totally involved in sustaining and developing the Club over many years and on whose shoulders rested much of the heavy workload in the move from Hatchwoods and establishment of the Frogs Abbey course.

In 1979 a new course record was set by John Skoulding with a gross score of 68. This was later reduced still further to 67 by James Kisby in 1982 and is still the current Course Record. This was equaled in 1996 by Jody Greenall.